Certificate of High School Equivalency Information


Official Certificates, Transcripts, and Verifications

Visit the Texas Certificate/Transcript Search to obtain a free verification letter or to purchase a PDF containing the Certificate of High School Equivalency with test scores for $5.  The PDF will include a diploma-style certificate suitable for framing and a transcript with test dates and scores. You can save the PDF to your computer or electronic device, email it to yourself or third parties, and/or print it. Purchases can be made by credit card or check (automated clearing house).  

Colleges and employers should obtain verifications and certificates directly from the Texas Certificate/Transcript Search as TEA no longer sends certificates or verifications via mail, fax, or email. 

Official Policy Letter  (PDF)

If the search returns "No Records Found," please create a Help Desk ticket to request a record search.

Help Desk for Customer Service

TxCHSE is officially moving to the Help Desk system for all customer service requests on December 11, 2017. This will provide a secure method of communicating personal information and documentation to agency staff. The previously used email will no longer be monitored. 
Visit  the   help desk 2  

Current High School Equivalency Exams

The State Board of Education (SBOE) voted January 29, 2016 to award contracts to three separate companies to provide high school equivalency assessments and there are now three testing options in Texas:  the GED test, the HiSET exam and the TASC test.  Upon the successful completion of a single provider's exams, the test taker will be issued a State of Texas Certificate of High School Equivalency.

The test taker chooses which test series to take, and the test language can be either English, Spanish, or a combination. Tests may only be administered by authorized testing centers. Following are the three assessments:

To view a side-by-side comparison, please visit Test Information - At a Glance and for more information:  High School Equivalency Frequently Asked Questions.

Test-Taker Eligibility

To take the high school equivalency exams in Texas, an individual must:

  • be a resident of Texas,
  • have a government-issued photo ID, and
  • be 18 years of age or older.

For more detailed information and exceptions, please visit our Eligibility Page.

Score Requirements

The minimum score requirements are determined by the test provider. 

Scores are typically available within three days for computer-based testing.  Paper-based test scores are typically available within 10 days.  Certificates are issued approximately three business days after the final computer-based test and approximately 14 days after the final paper-based test. TEA will email the initial certificate in a PDF file to the email address used to register for the exams.

Individuals cannot combine scores from a previous test series or different test series. Incomplete scores from tests taken prior to January 1, 2014 are no longer valid.
 
For more information on current and previous test scores, visit Test Score Requirements.

Preparation Information

Study material is available at most libraries and book stores. Most preparation books have practice tests that will help you determine when you are ready to test. Helpful information is available from each test provider website:

To find a preparation program in your area, contact Texas Center for the Advancement of Literacy & Learning (TCALL) at 800-441-READ (7323).


Program Authorization:

Texas Education Code

High School Equivalency Examinations Chapter 7.111  

Texas Administrative Code

TITLE 19                   EDUCATION
PART 2                     TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY
CHAPTER 89            ADAPTATIONS FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS
SUBCHAPTER C       TEXAS CERTIFICATE OF HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY     

Rules  

§89.41  Policy
§89.42  Official Testing Centers
§89.43  Eligibility for a Texas Certificate of High School Equivalency
§89.44  Identification
§89.45  Retesting
§89.46  Accommodations
§89.47  Issuance of the Certificate
  

Content Updated 12/8/2017