Program Evaluation: Out-of-School Learning Opportunities

Previous research indicates that after-school programs for students in at-risk situations can significantly improve student outcomes in such areas as academic performance, attendance, and discipline. TEA has implemented a number of state and federally funded after-school initiatives in Texas, including the Texas After-School Initiative for Middle Schools (TASI), the Optional Extended Year Program (OEYP), and the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program (21st CCLC). The evaluation reports and executive summaries are available in PDF format from the links below.

21st Century Community Learning Centers Program

The 21st CCLC program helped create community learning centers to provide additional instruction and support to students and their families outside normal school hours. The program facilitates greater interaction between schools and communities to increase greater parental participation in school life and to increase students' academic achievement. For more information see TEA's 21st CCLC page

The evaluation reports and executive summaries are available from the links below:

Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers: 2014–15 Evaluation Report (American Institutes for Research, May 2016)
Executive Summary (17 pages)

Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers: 2012–13 and 2013–14 Combined Evaluation Report (American Institutes for Research, July 2015)
Executive Summary (15 pages)

Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Year 2 Evaluation Report (American Institutes for Research, February 2013)
Executive Summary (18 pages)

Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Interim Evaluation Report (American Institutes for Research, April 2012)
Executive Summary (14 pages)

Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers Evaluation: 2007-2008 (Center for Research in Educational Policy and Learning Point Associates, August 2009)
Executive Summary (11 pages)

Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Annual Report 2006-07 (Education Innovations, LLC/Center for Research in Educational Policy and Learning Point Associate Consortium, March 2008)
Executive Summary (7 pages)
A Profile of Texas 21st Century Community Learning Centers, 2006-2007 (February 2008, 98 pages)

21st Century Community Learning Centers: Evaluation of Projects Funded During the 2004-2005 School Year (TEA, February 2007)
Executive Summary (5 pages)

The Evaluation of Texas 21st Century Community Learning Center Projects: Common Features of Promising Afterschool Programs in Texas (Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, August 2006)
The Evaluation of Texas 21st Century Community Learning Center Projects: Case Study Report (Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, August 2006)
Executive Summary (4 pages)

21st Century Community Learning Centers: Evaluation of Projects Funded For the 2003-04 School Year (TEA, January 2005)
Executive Summary (4 pages)

Intensive Summer Pilot Programs

Funded from 2008-2010, Intensive Summer Pilot (ISP) programs were collaborations between districts and institutions of higher education. The purpose was to provide intensive summer coursework to promote college and workforce readiness for middle school and high school students identified as being at risk of dropping out of school.  

The evaluation report and executive summary are available from the links below:

Evaluation of the Intensive Summer Pilot Program: A High School Success Pilot Program, February 2011 Report (ICF International, February 2011)
Executive Summary (16 pages)

Optional Extended Year Program

OEYP provided additional support and instruction for students in kindergarten through Grade 11 who were unlikely to be promoted to the following grade or for students in Grade 12 who were unlikely to graduate. OEYP enabled districts to provide services through extended-day, extended-week, or extended–year programs. 

The evaluation reports and executive summaries are available from the links below:

The Optional Extended-year Program: Evaluation of Activities, FY 2004 (TEA, April 2005)
Executive Summary (5 pages)

Texas After-School Initiative for Middle Schools

TASI served middle-school students at risk of academic failure or at risk for committing juvenile offenses. TASI-funded after school programs intended to increase participants' academic performance, reduce referrals to the juvenile justice system, and increase involvement of parents and mentors.

The evaluation report and executive summary are available from the links below:

Texas Study of Students at Risk: Efficacy of Grants Supporting Academic Success from Elementary Through High School (Texas Center for Educational Research, October 2004)
Executive Summary (13 pages)

Contact: ProgramEval@tea.texas.gov