Amendments to Science TEKS to be Considered April 21, 2017

Approved by Committee of the Full Board


Proposed Amendments to 19 TAC Chapter 112, Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science, Subchapter A, Elementary, Subchapter B, Middle School, and Subchapter C, High School

(Second Reading and Final Adoption)
(Board agenda page I-27)
[Official agenda item #4]

MOTION:  It was moved by Ms. Perez-Diaz and seconded by Ms. Hardy to recommend that the State Board of Education approve for second reading and final adoption proposed amendments to
19 TAC Chapter 112, Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science, Subchapter A, Elementary, Subchapter B, Middle School, and Subchapter C, High School.

MOTION AND VOTE:  It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(a)(1)(A), 112.12(a)(1)(A), and 112.13(a)(1)(A) to read:

“A central theme throughout the study of scientific investigation and reasoning; matter and energy; force, motion, and energy; Earth and space; and organisms and environment is active engagement in asking questions, creating a method to answer those questions, answering those questions, and communicating ideas, and exploring with scientific tools. Scientific investigation and reasoning involves practicing safe procedures, asking questions about the natural world, and seeking answers to those questions through simple observations and descriptive investigations.”

MOTION AND VOTE:  It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried unanimously to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(a)(1)(A), 112.12(a)(1)(A), and 112.13(a)(1)(A) to read:

“A central theme throughout the study of scientific investigation and reasoning; matter and energy; force, motion, and energy; Earth and space; and organisms and environment is active engagement in asking questions, creating a method to answer those questions, answering those questions, and communicating ideas, and exploring with scientific tools. Scientific investigation and reasoning involves practicing safe procedures, asking questions about the natural world, and seeking answers to those questions through simple observations used inand descriptive investigations.”

MOTION AND VOTE:  It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(a)(4), 112.12(a)(4), and 112.13(a)(4) to read:

“The study of elementary science includes planning and safely implementing classroom and outdoor descriptive (observational) investigations using scientific processes, including inquiry methods, analyzing information, making informed decisions, and using tools to collect and record information, while addressing the major concepts and vocabulary, in the context of physical, earth, and life sciences. Districts are encouraged to facilitate classroom and outdoor descriptive (observational) investigations for at least 60% of instructional time.”


MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer and seconded to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(b)(1)(A), 112.12(b)(1)(A), 112.13(b)(1)(A) to read:

“identify, describe discuss , and demonstrate safe and healthy practices as outlined in Texas Education Agency-approved safety standards during classroom and outdoor investigations, including wearing safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate, washing hands, and using materials appropriately; and”

The motion failed.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(b)(1)(A), 112.12(b)(1)(A), and 112.13(b)(1)(A) to read:

“identify, describe, and demonstrate safe and healthy practices as outlined in Texas Education Agency-approved safety standards during classroom and outdoor descriptive (observational) investigations, including wearing safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate, washing hands, and using materials appropriately; and”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(a)(1)(B) and 112.12(a)(1)(B) to read:

“Matter is described in terms of its physical properties, including relative size, weight, shape, color, and texture. The importance of light, heat, and sound energy is identified as it relates to the students' everyday life. The location and motion of objects are explored.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(a)(1)(B) and 112.12(a)(1)(B) to read:

“Matter is described in terms of its physical properties, including relative size, weight, shape, color, and texture. The importance of light, thermal heat, and sound energy is identified as it relates to the students' everyday life. The location and motion of objects are explored.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Melton-Malone, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.11(b)(4)(A) to read:

“collect information using tools, including computing devices computers, hand lenses, primary balances, cups, bowls, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices; non-standard measuring items; weather instruments such as demonstration thermometers; and materials to support observations of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.11(b)(6)(A) to read:

“use the senses to explore different forms of energy such as light, thermal heat, and sound;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.12(b)(6)(A) to read:

“use the senses to explore different forms of energy such as light, thermal heat, and sound;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.12(b)(5)(A) to read:

“classify objects by observable properties such as larger and smaller, heavier and lighter, shape, color, and texture, and the materials from which they are made.”

 

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Dr. Ellis, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education add new §112.12(b)(5)(C) to read:

“classify objects by the materials from which they are are made;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Dr. Ellis, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education maintain the original language in §112.12(b)(6)(C) to read:

“demonstrate and record the ways that objects can move such as in a straight line, zig zag, up and down, back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.13(a)(1)(B) to read:

“Within the physical environment, students expand their understanding of the properties of objects such as weight, temperature, shape, and flexibility then use those properties to compare, classify, and then combine the objects to do something that they could not do before. Students manipulate objects to demonstrate a change in motion and position.”

The motion failed.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.13(a)(4)(A) read:

“collect, record, and compare information using tools, including computers, hand lenses, rulers, primary balances, plastic beakers, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, and safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate; timing devices; weather instruments such as thermometers, wind vanes, and rain gauges; and materials to support observations of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Maynard, seconded by Mrs. Melton-Malone, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.11(b)(9)(A), 112.12(b)(9)(A), and 112.16(b)(9)(A) to remove references to once-living organisms.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis without objection to reconsider a previous vote on §112.13(a)(1)(B).

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis, seconded by Mr. Mercer, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.13(a)(1)(B) to read:

“Within the physical environment, students expand their understanding of the properties of objects such as weight, temperature, and flexibility then use those properties to compare, classify, and then combine the objects to do something that they could not do before. Students manipulate objects to demonstrate a change in motion and position.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.13(b)(5)(A) to read:

“classify matter by physical properties, including weight, relative temperature, texture, flexibility, and whether material is a solid or liquid;”

The motion failed.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.14(a)(4) to read:

“The study of elementary science includes planning and safely implementing classroom and outdoor investigations using scientific practices methods, analyzing information, making informed decisions, and using tools to collect and record information while addressing the content and vocabulary in physical, earth, and life sciences. Districts are encouraged to facilitate classroom and outdoor investigations for at least 60% of instructional time.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.14(b)(2) and 112.15(b)(2) to read:

“Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor descriptive investigations. The student is expected to:”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.14(b)(2) and 112.15(b)(2) to read:

“Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific practices inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor descriptive investigations. The student is expected to:”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.14(b)(5)(C) to read:

“predict, observe, and record changes in the state of matter caused by heating or cooling such as ice becoming liquid water or condensation forming on the outside of a glass of ice water or liquid water being heated to the point of becoming water vapor; and”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.14(b)(8)(B) to read:

describe and illustrate the Sun as a star composed of gases that provides light and thermalheat energy;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Ms. Hardy and carried unanimously to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.14(b)(10)(B) to read:

investigate and compare how animals and plants undergo a series of orderly changes in their diverse life cycles such as tomato plants, frogs, and lady beetles bugs.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.14(b)(4) to read:

“collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, wind vanes, rain gauges, pan balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, spring scales, hot plates, meter sticks, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, and Sun, Earth, and Moon system models; timing devices; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill and seconded by Ms. Hardy to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.15(b)(4) to read:

“collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including calculators, microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, mirrors, spring scales, triple beam balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, hot plates, meter sticks, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums.”

The motion failed.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.16(a)(1) to read:

“In Grade 5, descriptive, correlational, and experimental investigations are used to learn about the natural world. Students should understand that certain types of questions can be answered by investigations and that methods, models, and conclusions built from these investigations change as new observations are made. Models of objects and events are tools for understanding the natural world and can show how systems work. They have limitations and based on new discoveries are constantly being modified to more closely reflect the natural world.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.16(b)(2) to read:

“Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific practices methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.16(b)(2) to read:

“Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific practices during laboratory and outdoor descriptive, correlational, and experimental investigations. The student is expected to:”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.16(b)(9)(A) to read:

“observe the way organisms live and survive in their ecosystem by interacting with the living and nonliving components elements;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Mercer, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.16(b)(10)(A) to read:

“compare the structures and functions of different species that help them live and survive in a specific environment such as hooves on prairie animals or webbed feet in aquatic animals; and”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.16(a)(1)(A) to read:

“Within the physical environment, students learn about the physical properties of matter, including magnetism, mass, physical states of matter, relative density, solubility in water, and the ability to conduct or insulate electrical and thermal energy. Students explore the uses of light, thermal, electrical, mechanical, and sound energies.” 

Mrs. Cargill requested that staff identify inconsistencies regarding the use of “scientific methods” versus “scientific processes” before the Friday meeting.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Mrs. Miller, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education strike §112.16(b)(5)(C) and amend §112.16(b)(5)(B) to read:

“demonstrate that some mixtures, including solutions, maintain physical properties of their ingredients such as iron filings and sand, sand and water, and salt and water.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis to recommend that the State Board of Education maintain the original language in §112.16(b)(7)(C) to read:

identify alternative energy resources such as wind, solar, hydroelectric, geothermal, and biofuels; and

The motion failed.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mrs. Cargill, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.18(a)(1)(B)(iii) to read:

“Energy resources are available on a renewable,or nonrenewable, or indefinite basis. Understanding the origins and uses of these resources enables informed decision making. Students should consider the ethical/social issues surrounding Earth's natural energy resources, while looking at the advantages and disadvantages of their long-term uses.”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Maynard and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.18(b)(3)(A), 112.19(b)(3)(A), and 112.20(b)(3)(A) to read:

in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;”


MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.34(c)(4)(A) to read:

“compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and compare and contrast evaluate scientific explanations for their complexity;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis, seconded by Ms. Hardy, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.34(c)(6)(A) to read:

“identify components of DNA, identifydescribe how information for specifying the traits of an organism is carried in the DNA, and examine evaluate scientific explanations for the origin of DNA;”

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried unanimously to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §112.35(c)(8)(F) to read:  

“differentiate among double replacement (ion-swap) reactions, including acid-base reactions and precipitation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions such as synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, and combustion reactions;”

Ms. Martinez pointed out that the word “hypothesis” was missing from §112.39(c)(2)(D). The committee requested that staff make the technical edit to read:

“design and implement investigative procedures, including making observations, asking well defined questions, formulating testable hypothesis, identifying variables, selecting appropriate equipment and technology, evaluating numerical answers for reasonableness, and identifying causes and effects of uncertainties in measured data;

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Dr. Ellis, seconded by Mr. Maynard, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.10, 112.17, and 112.31 to change the implementation date from 20172018 to 20182019.

MOTION AND VOTE: It was moved by Mr. Maynard, seconded by Mrs. Cargill, and carried to recommend that the State Board of Education amend §§112.35(c)(3)(A), 112.38(c)(3)(A), 112.39(c)(3)(A) to read:

“analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;”    

VOTE: A vote was taken on the original motion to recommend that the State Board of Education approve for second reading and final adoption proposed amendments to 19 TAC Chapter 112, Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science, Subchapter A, Elementary, Subchapter B, Middle School, and Subchapter C, High School, as amended. The motion carried.  

Additional Amendments to be Considered

 

Grades 6-8, §§112.18, 112.19, and 112.20

(a)(1)(A)(ii) Descriptive, correlational, and experimental Scientific investigations are conducted for different reasons. All investigations require a research question, careful observations, data gathering, and analysis of the data to identify the patterns that will explain the findings. Descriptive investigations are used to explore new phenomena such as conducting surveys of organisms or measuring the abiotic components in a given habitat. Descriptive statistics include frequency, range, mean, median, and mode. A hypothesis is not required in a descriptive investigation. On the other hand, when conditions can be controlled in order to focus on a single variable, experimental research design is used to determine causation. Students should experience both types of investigations and understand that different scientific research questions require different research designs.

Grades 6-8, §§112.18, 112.19, and 112.20

Amend (b)(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student understands the Nature of Science and its role in understanding patterns in the natural world by using scientific and engineering practices and the contributions of scientists who use these practices uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions and knows the contributions of relevant scientists. The student is expected to:

Grade 7, §112.19

Add new (b)(5)(C) demonstrate and explain the cycling of matter within living systems such as in the decay of biomass in a compost bin or leaf litter in a forest;

Grade 8, §112.20

Add new (b)(5)(A)  each pure substance has characteristic physical and chemical properties (for any bulk quantity under given circumstances) that can be used to identify it;

§§112.11 and 112.12

Move to strike “weight” from the Introductions in grades K-1.

Kindergarten   Pg. I-34 (a) Introduction (1)(B) Matter is described in terms of its physical properties, including relative size, weight, shape, color, and texture.

Grade 1  Pg. I-37 (a) Introduction (1)(B) Matter is described in terms of its physical properties, including relative size, weight, shape, color, and texture.